Are Alliterative Lexical Chunks More Memorable Among Iranian EFL Learners?

Dr. Hadi Salehi, Sima Sarmadi & Bahareh Amiri,

English Department, Najafabad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Najafabad, Iran

The present study aims at investigating the effectiveness of alliteration on recalling lexical chunks among Iranian upper-intermediate EFL learners through dictation. To this end, 60 upper-intermediate Iranian EFL learners (females and males), where chosen. All the learners had the same vocabulary size in English, which was assessed by means of Nation’s Vocabulary Size Test (2015). Their level of proficiency approved that they were familiar with the target words in the dictation. The EFL learners were divided into two groups. Alliteration was explained for experimental group; however, the other group was blind about the actual aim of the research. Then 30 word pairs were dictated separately, each being read out two times by the instructor. The participants were needed to repeat each dictated item out loud (in chorus) before writing it down. After the dictation, the learners’ sheets were collected and they were given a five-minute break. Then, they were asked to write down on a new sheet as many of the dictated items as they could remember. The data were analyzed by a paired-sample t-test to find the differences of recall scores of alliterative items, filler items, and matched controls. The obtained results from both groups were also compared by two-way ANOVA. The results of an unannounced free recall test revealed significantly better recall of the alliterative stimuli, especially for the second group members who were aware of alliteration. The results of this study can be useful for curriculum developers, material designers, teachers, and learners.

 

The above abstract is part of the article which was accepted at The Third International Conference on Current Issues of Languages, Dialects and Linguistics (WWW.LLLD.IR)  & The Fifth National Conference on English Studies and Linguistics (WWW.ELTL.IR) , 31 January-1February 2019 , Iran-Ahwaz.

Improving Iranian EFL Learners' Vocabulary Knowledge via SMS and Spacing Effect

Dr. Hadi Salehi, Akbar Mosayebi & Azam Layeghi,

English Department, Najafabad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Najafabad, Iran

Given the importance of vocabulary in language learning, this study tried to investigate the effectiveness of short message service (SMS) and spacing effect on Iranian intermediate EFL learners’ vocabulary learning. To this end, 60 male and female intermediate learners, aged 17-27, of an English language institute in Isfahan, Iran, randomly selected, were divided into three equal groups, one control group (CG) and two experimental groups (EG1 & EG2) based on the results of a proficiency test, Quick Oxford Placement Test (QOPT). After administering a pretest and during a 6-week treatment, the participants in EG1 received English vocabularies chosen from Oxford Vocabulary Builder book, as well as definitions and example sentences through SMS without spacing and in EG2 with spacing throughout 18 sessions. However, the participants in control group were taught new vocabularies through conventional board and paper technique for the same period. Then, their pre- and posttest scores were compared using a one-way between-groups ANOVA. The results of vocabulary posttest (.15 <.05) indicated that the three groups did not significantly differ on the posttest. The results of this study can have pedagogical implications for language teachers, in that they can use SMS as a useful way of teaching large numbers of vocabularies.

 

The above abstract is part of the article which was accepted at The Third International Conference on Current Issues of Languages, Dialects and Linguistics (WWW.LLLD.IR)  & The Fifth National Conference on English Studies and Linguistics (WWW.ELTL.IR) , 31 January-1February 2019 , Iran-Ahwaz.

The Effect of Raising English Students’ Awareness of Contrastive Rhetoric on their L2 Writing Ability: The Case for Iranian Students

Dr. Mansooreh Amiri & Maryam Malekshahian,

Lorestan University, Iran

Mastering L2 writing has always been presenting, and will continue to present, L2 learners with a considerable challenge (Zhang, 2008). This is due to the fact that becoming a skilled L2 writer “requires the mastery of a variety of linguistic, cognitive, and sociocultural competencies” (Barkaoui, 2007) including proficiency both in the L1 and the L2, metacognitive awareness, and knowledge of the rhetorical conventions of the two languages (Jalilifar, 2008; Myles, 2002). The last on the list (i.e. rhetorical conventions) came into light only after Kaplan’s pioneering work. According to Kaplan’s findings, people of different cultures use different (or contrastive) rhetoric while thinking in general and speaking and writing in particular. Consequently, reading and comprehending a text developed by a speaker of a language such as Persian would be difficult for a speaker of another language like English. Although it has been trending in new directions (Sugiharto, 2007), thenceforth the area has been mainly concerned with the impact of L1 rhetorical features on L2 writing (Zhang, 2008).    In the recent decades, the area has had a major impact on the way L2 teachers approach L2 writing. Yet, it has not significantly find its way into Iranian context of L2 teaching in general and L2 writing in particular. As a result, Iranian students with different levels of proficiency have difficulty developing L2 writing products as they are supposed to. In the present study our concern was to tech rhetorical conventions to of L1 and L2 to language learners in a hope to help them in their writing skills.

 

The above abstract is part of the article which was accepted at The Third International Conference on Current Issues of Languages, Dialects and Linguistics (WWW.LLLD.IR)  & The Fifth National Conference on English Studies and Linguistics (WWW.ELTL.IR) , 31 January-1February 2019 , Iran-Ahwaz.

Problem-Based Speaking Tasks and Spoken proficiency of Iranian EFL Learners: With a Focus on Mobile Phones

Loghman Ansarian & Dr. Teoh Mei Lin,

University of Malaya, Malaysia

Problem-Based Learning (PBL) is a cognitive approach to language learning which has been of attention to language educators in the last decade. Although previous research has revealed that PBL is a promising approach to language learning, a detailed look at this approach and its effect on linguistic features of spoken proficiency of the learners is absent. In an attempt to shed light on this issue, the researcher conducted a study in the EFL context of Iran and compared the effect of problem-based mobile-assisted language learning with the conventional language learning approach (communicative language learning) in Iran. The experimental group (n=37) went through PBL instruction and the control group went through conventional instruction. The results of data analysis after 26 sessions of treatment revealed that PBL can positively affect participants' knowledge of grammar, vocabulary, spoken fluency, and pronunciation; however, in terms of task achievement, no significant effect was found. This study can have pedagogical implications for language teachers, and material developers.

 

The above abstract is part of the article which was accepted at The Third International Conference on Current Issues of Languages, Dialects and Linguistics (WWW.LLLD.IR)  & The Fifth National Conference on English Studies and Linguistics (WWW.ELTL.IR) , 31 January-1February 2019 , Iran-Ahwaz.

An Evaluation of Reading Materials: Vision 1

Dr. Maryam Azarnoosh (Corresponding author), Fateme Daneshgar(MA student) & Zahra Daneshzadeh(MA student),

Department of English, Semnan Branch, Islamic Azad University, Semnan, Iran

The ability to read is a valuable asset that is considered highly important for personal, social, and academic achievement. Reading materials can be used for facilitating the learning of a language. They should be in accordance with the learners’ needs, culture, and context. It seems that reading comprehension is more difficult for EFL learners than for native speakers. So the materials should be designed in consideration with learners’ age, experience and needs, contextual factors, and educational objectives and policies. In Iran, vision 1is taught at high school level. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the reading sections of the aforementioned book based on some recent principles such as Tomlinson and Masuhara’s (2013) framework. The results indicate little improvement in the reading sections of the newly developed textbook in comparison to the former textbooks taught at high school level. There are also weaknesses in the reading parts in not meeting the needs of teachers and learners.

 

The above abstract is part of the article which was accepted at The Third International Conference on Current Issues of Languages, Dialects and Linguistics (WWW.LLLD.IR)  & The Fifth National Conference on English Studies and Linguistics (WWW.ELTL.IR) , 31 January-1February 2019 , Iran-Ahwaz.

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