Rhetoric of Decline in Peter Heller’s The Dog Stars

Zahra Jafari,

University of Waterloo, Canada

Post-apocalyptic fiction portrays the lives and struggles of apocalypse survivors after a wide-scale catastrophe wreaks the planet. These narratives intend to remind their audience of man’s ability to bring about his own doom, by exploring environmental disasters that could foreseeably ensue anthropogenic hazards: nuclear war, global warming, viral pandemic and technological perils that will decimate the population on the one hand, and spawn new threats for the remaining population on the other hand. Apocalyptic events in this literary genre indicate a fear for sudden civilization collapse and its relation to anthropogenic interventions among people. Thus, post-apocalyptic envisions usually act as a commentary on present social conditions and/or reflect deep-rooted social fears and anxieties. As a major theme of these narratives revolves around characters’ choices and their moral concepts of the pre-existing world, this paper aims to rhetorically analyze how Peter Heller’s protagonist copes with the terror of post-apocalyptic world in The Dog Stars to prolong his survival. Moreover, this study demonstrates that in Heller’s novel, despite the looming menace and the hostile environment, the need for companionship and security functions as the cement that holds individuals together to dream for a revival of civilization.

 

The above abstract is part of the article which was accepted at The Third International Conference on Current Issues of Languages, Dialects and Linguistics (WWW.LLLD.IR)  & The Fifth National Conference on English Studies and Linguistics (WWW.ELTL.IR) , 31 January-1February 2019 , Iran-Ahwaz.

The Impact of Repetition as a Stylistic Device in Political Discourse: Trump as a Case Study

Dr. Azhar Hassan Sallomi & Dr. Muayyad Omran Chiad,

University of Karbala, Iraq

The unseen ideologies the political discourse conveys and its crucial power have fascinated the attention of researchers and encouraged them to investigate in this scope. This paper is an attempt to explore the significance of repetition as a stylistic device in English political discourse .Taking Trump’s speeches as a sample and based on Kemertelidze and Manjavidze’s (2013) model, the dissimilar categories of repetition as well as the motives behind their manifestation are scanned in such speeches.  The paper reveals that Trump tends to use anaphora and epiphora  sorts of repetition more than  others as he grasps well how they enhance the rhythmic combination of speech owing to development of intonation and sound  uniqueness at initial or final position of a sentence .  Further, Trump intends deliberately to repeat a word, a phrase, and even a sentence to accomplish goals like illumination, prominence, persuasion, warning, making a point memorable, and creating cohesion. Using such fundamental tool, the speaker flourishes his own influence or power upon people, manipulates them, and consequently reforms an opinion.

 

The above abstract is part of the article which was accepted at The Third International Conference on Current Issues of Languages, Dialects and Linguistics (WWW.LLLD.IR)  & The Fifth National Conference on English Studies and Linguistics (WWW.ELTL.IR) , 31 January-1February 2019 , Iran-Ahwaz.

Camilla Gibb’s Aziz and Lilly Carrying the Sweetness of Oriental “otherness” In Their Belly!

Dr. Lale Massiha,

University of Tabriz, Iran

“otherness” is what every speaking subject unknowingly experiences from the time she/he identifies herself/himself with the image in the mirror, considering the initial misrecognision of self/other(Lacan).  Some subjects, like Lilly and Dr. Aziz, in Camilla Gibb’s “Sweetness in the Belly”, however, experience double “otherness” because of their different linguistic and socio-cultural position in the context of the society they live in or belong to. They are being considered different in various ways; Lilly is the whitest and Aziz is the darkest! But both experience this otherness in society and within the family in their own ways. This paper attempts to figure the roots of their otherness: Lilly as an English person who lives in orient but shares the beliefs and Aziz as a modern doctor who lives in his homeland but has different beliefs. Sharing the sense of “otherness”, they build a strong emotional connection as “outsiders”. Does being strangers bond them to one another?

 

The above abstract is part of the article which was accepted at The Third International Conference on Current Issues of Languages, Dialects and Linguistics (WWW.LLLD.IR)  & The Fifth National Conference on English Studies and Linguistics (WWW.ELTL.IR) , 31 January-1February 2019 , Iran-Ahwaz.

A Cross-Cultural Approach to Courtesy: A Sociolinguistic Study of Differences between Native and Non-Native Speakers of English

Dr. Salih Mahdi Adai AlMamoory & Omar Ali Wally Atatfa,

University of Babylon & College of Arts & Sciences University of New Haven, Iraq

Courtesy is a matter of significant importance in the study of the different cultures, and how to be courteous in a certain culture depends, to a great extent, on the social norms and behaviours of that culture (or a social group). Therefore, what could be taken as 'courteous' in one society may be frowned upon as 'discourteous' in another. The current study approaches this topic in a twofold way: on the one hand, it highlights the erroneous uses of courtesy by Iraqi students of English as a Foreign Language (henceforth, EFL) as compared to courtesy norms adhered to by the native speakers of English, as well as draw a dividing line between the ways in which courtesy is used by female and male students of EFL in Iraq. It is hypothesized that there are remarkable differences between the courtesy rules by the native speakers of English and those of the non-native; and, that there are differences between male and female non-native speakers of English for the favour of the females. To achieve its purpose, the current study relies on sociolinguistic concepts, such as Cultural Knowledge, Gender Differences, Variance, etc. It also depends on a questionnaire which is distributed to Iraq EFL students at the University of Babylon to test the proposed hypotheses. The study finds out that, due to the transfer from their first language's cultural norms, the non-native speakers of English use the courtesy norms of English erroneously; and that female non-native EFL speakers rely more on courteous norms than males do.

 

The above abstract is part of the article which was accepted at The Third International Conference on Current Issues of Languages, Dialects and Linguistics (WWW.LLLD.IR)  & The Fifth National Conference on English Studies and Linguistics (WWW.ELTL.IR) , 31 January-1February 2019 , Iran-Ahwaz.

The Effect of “Ta’ziyeh” on Modern Iraq Poetic Drama with Special Reference to Muhammad Ali Al-Khafaji

Dr. Ammar Shamil Kadhim Al-Khafaji,

University of Baghdad, Iraq

The discussion of the theme of martyrdom and redemption through suffering in modern Iraqi poetic dramas requires an investigation of the origin and the roots of martyrdom from earlier times. Drama and religious rituals went hand in hand in earlier stages of all civilizations. The art of drama, as all arts, was in its initial stages closely connected to religion. In the Islamic world, a major historical event which is the martyrdom of Imam Hussein, the grandson of the Prophet of Islam, Mohammad, has become the central inspiration for the development of the Islamic commemorative drama called "Ta’ziyeh. The rituals of Muharram in Iraq, especially the Ta'ziyeh (Tashabeeh) played an important role in stimulating and motivating the writers of poetic drama in Iraq during the twentieth century like Abdul Razaq Abdul Wahid and Mohammad Ali Al-Khafaji to write modern poetic drama.  Muhammad Ali Al Khafaji's Thahab Liyaqood Al Hulum (He went to lead the Dream) is atypical example of such kind of verse plays. Poetic plays will always be a necessity. They are like the phoenix, may die for a time, but it will rise from the ashes again.

 

The above abstract is part of the article which was accepted at The Third International Conference on Current Issues of Languages, Dialects and Linguistics (WWW.LLLD.IR)  & The Fifth National Conference on English Studies and Linguistics (WWW.ELTL.IR) , 31 January-1February 2019 , Iran-Ahwaz.

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