Persian-Albanian-Balkan Contact Areas: Some Linguistic / Cultural Aspects of the ‘Complementarity Hypothesis’

Dr. Mirushe Hoxha,

University “Ss. Cyril and Methodius”, Macedonia

 

This paper aims to set forth an hypothesis of the complementarity between grammatical forms and cultural schemas of apparently different cultural and linguistic contexts in understanding the phenomena. For this purpose, the research brings together the optative mood of the Albanian language formed by the suffix–fsh, and the symbolism of Darafsh Kaviani. Further comparative analysis of the semanticsof Persian and Albanian words containing the phoneme group fsh, the Kaveh’s Flag, the optative mood itself, and its grammatical form inthe Albanian language (-fsh) entails the core evidence of the hypothesis offered in this paper: namely, that the phoneme group fsh tends to appear as a meaningful pre-Indo-European substrate conserved both literally and metaphorically in the Persian and Albanian culture and/or language. The paper sets the general context of this complementarity by assessing a corpus of Persian words not only in Albanian but also in the Macedonian, Bulgarian, Bosnian, Serbian and Croatian languages, and their phonetic, morphological and semantic modifications comparing to the source, i.e. Persian. The latter comparative analysis is also promotionally offered by this paper, while the rationale of the ‘complementarity hypothesis’ is corroborated by Gregory Bateson’s thesis on the fundamental analogies between different contexts and their ‘relata’.

 

The above abstract is part  of the article which was accepted at The First International Conference on Current Issues of Languages, Dialects and Linguistics (WWW.LLLD.IR) & The Third National Conference on English Studies and Linguistics (WWW.ELTL.IR) , 2-3 February 2017 , Iran-Ahwaz.

The Effect of Metadiscourse Instruction on the Writing Performance of Iranian EFL Learners

Dr. Mahboubeh Taghizadeh & Shadi Heidarpour,

Iran University of Science and Technology, Iran

 

This study aimed at investigating the impact of metadiscourse instruction, based on the classification proposed by Hyland (2000), on the writing performance of three groups of EFL learners (i.e., pre-intermediate, intermediate, and upper-intermediate). The participants (N=90) were female learners studying English at the Kish English language institute. In this study, two instruments were used. To investigate if the learners had knowledge about the correct application of metadicourse markers in their writing, a pretest of essay writing was administered. The second instrument, the posttest, was also a writing task administered at the end of the four week instruction in order to find if metadiscourse instruction had any impact on the learners' posttest of writing. In order to operationalize the treatment, a handout of writing including instruction on the different categories of metadiscourse elements along with a number of essay samples and cloze tests were offered to the learners. The results of paired samples t-tests revealed that instruction on metadiscourse markers was effective in enhancing the writing score of the experimental groups at the pre-intermediate, intermediate, and upper-intermediate levels. The interaction effect between group and levels of language proficiency was statistically significant. There was a significant main effect for the levels of language proficiency but no significant main effect for the group. The findings revealed that there was a difference in the writing scores of learners at the different proficiency level after receiving instruction on the metadiscourse markers, but the experimental and control groups did not significantly differ in their writing scores.

 

 

The above abstract is part  of the article which was accepted at The First International Conference on Current Issues of Languages, Dialects and Linguistics (WWW.LLLD.IR) & The Third National Conference on English Studies and Linguistics (WWW.ELTL.IR) , 2-3 February 2017 , Iran-Ahwaz.

English Animation Dubbing Based Techniques and Iranian Intermediate EFL learners’ Nativelike Pronunciation Development

Pooneh karimzadeh & Maryam Rezaei Ghahroudi,

Payamnoor University & Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Iran

 

This research was an attempt to investigate the remarkable dubbing techniques that can improve communicative competence to achieve appropriate level of speaking abilities. The growth of technology increases the need for learning an international language. Because of this learners tend to improve their speaking abilities specifically the suprasegmental features that can shed light on the quality of their interaction and communication. Since EFL learners’ muscles need to be well developed to produce the new words of the target language, pronunciation becomes so difficult. The main focus of this study was the investigation of a great deal of variety in the dubbing techniques that lead to more rehearsal, high motivation, self-confident and more successful English speakers. In order to investigate the relationship between dubbing and improved suprasegmental features, 24 homogeneous intermediate 10-15 year old learners were chosen from 40 randomly by an oral test that was divided to  two sub groups, i.e,12 in experimental who received treatment and 12 in control group without that. Students took posttest orally and their performances were recorded and investigated. The result of data analysis indicated that dubbing based strategies have a significant influence onnative like pronunciation development.

 

The above abstract is part  of the article which was accepted at The First International Conference on Current Issues of Languages, Dialects and Linguistics (WWW.LLLD.IR) & The Third National Conference on English Studies and Linguistics (WWW.ELTL.IR) , 2-3 February 2017 , Iran-Ahwaz.

On the Positive Perfectionism of EFL and Non-EFL Learners

Mahdieh Noori & Dr. Elaheh Sotoudehnama,

Alzahra University, Iran

 

Perfectionism as a multidimensional personality construct is still not a deeply explored land since accumulated evidence has mainly focused on the neurotic, unhealthy, and negative perfectionists, which are vulnerable to depression, procrastination, anxiety, neuroticism, and lower academic success. On the other hand, very few studies have been conducted worldwide on the normal, healthy, and positive perfectionists, which are characterized by realistic and reasonable self-expectations. To contribute to fill this gap in the Iranian context as a typical EFL context, the present study aimed at investigating the general level of positive perfectionism of EFL learners and non-EFL learners to see which group benefits more from the positive consequences of perfectionism and whether it relates to their academic fields of study in particular. To these aims, a total number of 73 M.A. students (47 TEFL students and 26 students of the Islamic Philosophy of Teaching and Learning) from two Iranian state universities completed the 20-item positive perfectionism questionnaire (Terry-short et al., 1995). The results of the independent samples t-test revealed a non-significant difference between the high positive perfectionism of the EFL learner’s group and their non-EFL learner counterparts. As an implication of the current study, the results may strengthen the findings of the literature that positive perfectionism is strengthened during the Iranian early childhood bearing practices and the household child-parent interactions through the emphasis on orderliness, organization, and positive striving. However, they lend credence to the fact that the later-coming variables of academic major or EFL learning act have no considerable consequence on the perfectionism of the students.

 

The above abstract is part  of the article which was accepted at The First International Conference on Current Issues of Languages, Dialects and Linguistics (WWW.LLLD.IR) & The Third National Conference on English Studies and Linguistics (WWW.ELTL.IR) , 2-3 February 2017 , Iran-Ahwaz.

Strategy Application in Translation of Qur’anic Proper Names: An Analysis within chesterman’s (1997) Model

Dr. Mohammad Reza Falahati Qadimi Fumani(Chairman, Department of Computational Linguistics, Regional Information Center for Science and Technology, Shiraz, Iran) &  Khadijeh Izadpanah(Department of Foreign Language, Marvdasht Branch, Islamic Azad University, Marvdasht, Iran)

 

The main purpose of this study was to study the differences among six translators in their application of strategies while translating proper names in the Holy Qur’an from Arabic into English. Using Chesterman’s (1997) model, proper names in the Holy Qur’an as translated by Yusef Ali, Pickthall, Saffarzadeh, Arberry, Qarai  and Shakir were analyzed. In all, 100 proper names were extracted and analysed. The results illustrated ‘loan translation’ had been used most by all the six translators; ‘paraphrase’ was used the least by all translators expect Saffarzade and Shakir. Shakir used both ‘paraphrase’ and ‘synonymy’ minimally; whereas, Saffarzade used ‘synonymy’ minimally. Another finding was that all the six translators had used only three of the whole list of strategies that had been introduced by Chesterman (1997). Further, it was observed that the six translators were statistically different in their application of each single strategy. Finally, each translator had used the three strategies from Chesterman’s (1997) model significantly differently. The results of this study could be used by students and instructors of translation studies particularly those working on translation of religious texts.

 

The above abstract is part  of the article which was accepted at The First International Conference on Current Issues of Languages, Dialects and Linguistics (WWW.LLLD.IR) & The Third National Conference on English Studies and Linguistics (WWW.ELTL.IR) , 2-3 February 2017 , Iran-Ahwaz.

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