Language Distribution in Chahar Mahal va Bakhtiari Province

Dr. Mortaza Taheri-Ardali & Dr. Erik Anonby,

Shahrekord University, Carleton University & Universität Bamberg, Iran

 

Chahar Mahal va Bakhtiari Province, with nearly 900,000 inhabitants, is located on the eastern edge of the Zagros Mountains. This province is bounded by Khuzestan, Lorestan, Esfahan Province, and Kohgiluyieh va Boyer Ahmad. Our work on Chahar Mahal va Bakhtiari Province was carried out as part of the research programme, the Atlas of the Languages of Iran (www.iranatlas.net). The first step in our work was a survey of language distribution in each of the 876 populated places (districts, cities and villages) of the province. The results of our research showed Bakhtiari as a dominant language spoken in the western, northern and southern parts of the province, and as the largest language in the capital city, Shahr-e Kord. The Turkic language community is found in about 40 villages, mainly in the north-eastern part of the Province. Urban Chaharmahali dialects are spoken in the major urban centers of Shahr-e Kord, Borujen, Farrokh Shahr and Hafshejan. Rural Chaharmahali dialects, which differ from their urban counterparts, include a number of villages in the north-east. Among these, areas such as Kiar and Gandoman have previously been treated in the literature – ethnically and then linguistically – as Charmahali. However, they share important linguistic features in common with Bakhtiari.

 

The above abstract is part  of the article which was accepted at The First International Conference on Current Issues of Languages, Dialects and Linguistics (WWW.LLLD.IR) & The Third National Conference on English Studies and Linguistics (WWW.ELTL.IR) , 2-3 February 2017 , Iran-Ahwaz.

A Comparative Study: Impact of Various Graphic Organizers on Learners' Reading Comprehension Skills

Sosil Somokian,

Box Hill College of Kuwait, Kuwait

 

The purpose of this quantitative study was to compare the impact of KWL, QAR and SQ3R on developing learners’ ability to decode and reconstruct meaning from reading texts.

The study was done at Box Hill College of Kuwait. Participants were adult female learners, enrolled in an intensive ESL course. The research questions were: 1. Will learners’ ability to decode and reconstruct meaning from text improve upon using various graphic organizers. 2. Which organizer is more efficient in enhancing learners’ comprehension skills and 3.Whichstrategy is easier to master and implement.  Data for this quantitative study was collected from several sources: a. Learners’ reading time records during the 20 practice sessions; b. Scores from completed graphic organizers; c.Teachers’ feedback forms; d. Scores from 5 reading tests  (Placement, 3 progress and 1 exit); e. Surveys compiling learners’ opinion about various graphic organizers. In total 75 students randomly assigned to 5 groups (4 experimental, 1 control) participated in this study for 5 weeks. Results showed that students who used KWL scored the highest, followed by SQ3R, QAR and finally the group that was trained to use all 3 graphic organizers. Detailed analysis of results highlighted some of the reasons behind these findings.

 

The above abstract is part  of the article which was accepted at The First International Conference on Current Issues of Languages, Dialects and Linguistics (WWW.LLLD.IR) & The Third National Conference on English Studies and Linguistics (WWW.ELTL.IR) , 2-3 February 2017 , Iran-Ahwaz.

From Mazandarani Folklore: Games in Gorji Mahale (Dialectological Materials)

Dr. Zviadi Tskhvediani & Paata Japaridze,

AkakiTsereteli State University, Georgia

 

According to the historical source of Iskander Beg Munshi in 1615 the Georgians and Armenians were first exiled to Iran by Shah Abbas. Their majority settled down in the Shah’s favorite resorts by the Caspian Sea: Farahabad and Ashraf (now Behshahr – full historic name بلاد الأشرف (arab. bilād al-ʼašraf). Today in the northern Iranian province of Mazandaran ethnically Georgian population lives in the village ofGorjī Mahalleh situated 10 kilometers away from the city of Behshahr in the direction towards the city of Sari. In August 2014 a team of Georgian scholars 2014 (project leader: Paata Japaridze) visited Mazandaran in order to explore the culture, speech and lifestyle of the so-called “Mazandarani Georgians”. In 2014-2016 three scientific expeditions took place. The present paper deals with the dialectological and folclore data/materials regarding folk games collected and recorded in Gorjī Mahalleh:čančar bāzi; kamarband bāzi; yer  bә kinge; xajejoz (xaje=xatije, joz=paridan) ; taftavixamīre mā .The texts of these games are significant in terms of Mazandarani dialect. Research into the language of Mazandarani Georgians is of vital importance to better understanding of ethno-linguistic contacts.

 

The above abstract is part  of the article which was accepted at The First International Conference on Current Issues of Languages, Dialects and Linguistics (WWW.LLLD.IR) & The Third National Conference on English Studies and Linguistics (WWW.ELTL.IR) , 2-3 February 2017 , Iran-Ahwaz.

Tashlhiyt Syllables without Vowels: Perception and Whistled Speech

Dr. Rachid Ridouane,

CNRS & Sorbonne Nouvelle University, France

 

Tashlhiyt has come to linguists’ attention due to its rare phonotactic structure. Words and sentences in this Moroccan Amazigh language can be composed of consonants only, e.g. [tkkststttfktstt] « you took it off and gave it ». A consequence of this is that any consonant can be a syllable nucleus, making [tk] or [kf] common syllables. This analysis is backed up by extensive work since the mid- 80s. In this study two additional types of evidence are provided: (i) native judgments and (ii) whistled speech. i. Thirty native speakers provided metalinguistic judgments about how a set of 100 words is partitioned. ii. Three professional whistlers carried into a whistled signal (isinsg) a dataset including 50 words and 10 sentences. Results for test words having #CCV, #CCCV or #CCCC structures show that more than 90% of the 30 subjects’ responses correspond to a bisyllabic parsing. Such items are also whistled in two parts, as evidenced in the spectrographic analysis. The word [gli] ‘guide’, which sounds like English glee, is a telling example. This and similar CCV sequences respecting the SSP are almost universally considered to have one syllable. Tashlhiyt speakers and whistlers overwhelmingly judge them as having two parts C.CV.

 

The above abstract is part  of the article which was accepted at The First International Conference on Current Issues of Languages, Dialects and Linguistics (WWW.LLLD.IR) & The Third National Conference on English Studies and Linguistics (WWW.ELTL.IR) , 2-3 February 2017 , Iran-Ahwaz.

Acquisition of English by Adult Brahvi and Balochi speakers of Pakistan

Dr. Nasir Abbas Rizvi Syed & Muhammad Zafar,

Lasbela Univeristy of Agriculture, Water and Marine Sciences Uthal Balochistan Pakistan

 

Critical period hypothesis claims that after puberty, learners lose access to universal grammar (UG). Consequently, adult learners cannot acquire L2 accurately. Brown (2000, 1998) on the other hand, claims that access to UG remains intact after adolescence. In her opinion, it is L1 interference, not UG, which influences L2 acquisition; if a phonological feature differentiating two new L2 sounds is active in L1 of adult learners, they will acquire such new sounds. And if the relevant feature is not active in L1, the L2 contrast will not be acquired. Eastern Balochi has only [f] and Western Balochi has [p]. Pashto lacks this pair/contrast but has velar [g ɣ] contrast. Thus, feature [continuant] which differentiates [p f] is active in Pashto and Brahvi but inactive in Balochi. Two perception experiments were conducted with 40 adult learners of English and Urdu who speak Balochi , Pashto and Brahvi . They identified words of Urdu/English starting with [p f]. The results show that all participants including Westerrn Balochi speakers perceived [f] more accurately than [p]. [f] was perceived more accurately because of stronger acoustic signals. These results confirm that phonetic signals have stronger role in perception-based learning than L1 feature geometry or UG.

 

The above abstract is part  of the article which was accepted at The First International Conference on Current Issues of Languages, Dialects and Linguistics (WWW.LLLD.IR) & The Third National Conference on English Studies and Linguistics (WWW.ELTL.IR) , 2-3 February 2017 , Iran-Ahwaz.

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