Alternatives to Gender Segregation in Saudi Classrooms

Adela Rahmati & Dr. Tamrika Khvtisiashvili,

Alfaisal University, Saudi Arabia

 

Higher Education in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia remains significantly gender-segregated. The integration of genders is a complex undertaking that is still in its emergent phases. The authors argue that modernization of education, which is necessary for ultimate higher quality of instruction, requires an eventual integration of the sexes, even when the initial stages are less than perfect. The question examined in this study is the perception of current students in a mixed learning environment who receive lectures in two story, balcony-style classrooms, with male students and a male instructor on the ground floor, and females on the floor above, separated by a sheet of mirrored, frosted glass. 280 male and female studentsof a STEM University in Saudi Arabia were asked a series of questions on a Likert Scale (1-6) to determine their attitudes regarding learning, instruction, comfort, practicality, and motivation. The results of the survey indicated that while this classroom setup remains limited and imperfect, students prefer this structure as a step towards modernization and advancement of education in the KSA, and that the benefits gained from studying within a mixed environment outweigh the current, less-than-perfect set-up. ​

 

The above abstract is part  of the article which was accepted at The First International Conference on Current Issues of Languages, Dialects and Linguistics (WWW.LLLD.IR) & The Third National Conference on English Studies and Linguistics (WWW.ELTL.IR) , 2-3 February 2017 , Iran-Ahwaz.

On the Significance of “Fun Hot-Seat” Program on Reducing Sense of Failure and Enhancing Interaction of Iranian Low-Intermediate EFL Learners

Dr. Mehri Hadad Narafshan & Said Rahimi,

Kerman Branch, Islamic Azad University, Iran

 

The ever-increasing numbers of EFL learners in Iran adds greater urgency to the need to prioritize the most effective means by which language learning can be enhanced. One of the difficult parts of learning for Iranian English language learners is the sense of failure and lack of interaction. Using educational fun games for learning English has been very popular for several decades. To this end, the present study investigates improving language learning of Iranian EFL learners in relation to the following criteria: eliminating sense of failure; increasing interaction and motivation through applying fun hot-seat programas a new learning tool. The major findings reveal that students evidenced significant improvements in their learning motivation and interaction, and their sense of failure were reduced when learning included fun hot-seat program. The various implications for pedagogical application of gaming in regards to enhancing low-intermediate EFL learners’ performance are also suggested.

 

The above abstract is part  of the article which was accepted at The First International Conference on Current Issues of Languages, Dialects and Linguistics (WWW.LLLD.IR) & The Third National Conference on English Studies and Linguistics (WWW.ELTL.IR) , 2-3 February 2017 , Iran-Ahwaz.

A Linguistic Atlas for Iran’s Languages

Dr. Erik Anonby & Dr. Mortaza Taheri-Ardali,

Carleton University, Universität Bamberg & Shahr-e Kord University, Canada & Iran

 

There have been a number of important efforts to map out the languages of Iran, but until now no language atlas, or even a comprehensive and detailed country-level language map, has been produced. One of the recent projects which aims to fill this gap in the literature is the Atlas of the Languages of Iran (http://iranatlas.net/), an international collaborative effort involving partners in Iran and internationally. As outlined in earlier work (Anonby 2015), the Atlas has been designed with the following key features: use of the open-source, open-access Nunaliit Atlas Framework (http://nunaliit.org/); developed by an international team of volunteer scholars and students; includes each of Iran’s some 60,000 cities and villages; capable of remote contributions and moderation of input by Atlas editors; brings together existing publications and new data; development and implementation of questionnaires for sociolinguistic, lexical, phonological and morphosyntactic research; references sources for all data, whether published work, collaborator field notes or user contributions; and allows for comparison of language identification maps with language data maps. The eventual and ultimate goal of our research is to enable production of a comprehensive, detailed and reliable online Atlas showing the distribution of languages and linguistic structures for all of Iran.

 

 

The above abstract is part  of the article which was accepted at The First International Conference on Current Issues of Languages, Dialects and Linguistics (WWW.LLLD.IR) & The Third National Conference on English Studies and Linguistics (WWW.ELTL.IR) , 2-3 February 2017 , Iran-Ahwaz.

 

Rudoni: A Transitional Bandari Dialect of Inland Hormozgan

Dr. Erik Anonby & Hassan Mohebbi Bahmani,

Carleton University, Universität Bamberg & Islamic Azad University, Minab Branch, Canada & Iran

 

The Rudoni dialect is spoken in the Rudān District (shahrestān) of Hormozgān Province, southern Iran, in the area to the north of Mināb District and a hundred kilometres west of the provincial capital, Bandar Abbas. Rudoni is not well-known, but it is mentioned by Pelevin (2002), who lists it as one of a number of Southwestern Iranian dialects encircling the Bandari dialect of Bandar Abbas: those of Menujān, Mināb, Rudān, HājiĀbād, Bandar Lengeh, and the islands of Kish, Qeshm and Hormoz. Pelevin views all of these dialects as closely related and states that together with Bandari, they constitute a distinct subgroup of the dialects of Hormozgān Province. This paper presents results from an initial dialectological study of Rudoni, conducted in the town of Berentinin the south portion of Rudān District. The data, which are primarily lexical and phonological, show that Rudoni does indeed share many traits with other Iranian languages of south-west Iran, and other dialects of the Bandari Group in particular. However, our findings also suggest that Rudoni is transitional to language varieties to the north, east and south – Kahnuji, Balochi andBashkardi– and that it exhibits some distinctive structures of its own.

 

The above abstract is part  of the article which was accepted at The First International Conference on Current Issues of Languages, Dialects and Linguistics (WWW.LLLD.IR) & The Third National Conference on English Studies and Linguistics (WWW.ELTL.IR) , 2-3 February 2017 , Iran-Ahwaz.

SH : A Focus Associated Clitic in Kurdish

Sharare Soleimani,

University of Kurdistan, Iran

 

This article has argued the contribution of the clitic SH to interpretation and association of an informational structure and its role in discourse structure of Kurdish. The main concept of article concerning how SH clitic behaves like a focalization implement. This clitic, generally described a multi-function particle fulfilling the role of morphological implement lexically carries an existential presupposition and takes its scope at least over one of the constituent that has chosen as a host.in Kurdish SH clitic is associated with different structural positions. The clitic SH syntactically assigns focus to constrain one of the variables and according Halpern (1995, 15) its placement is after the left edge of the first phrase of clause which is called 2D placement. The interaction of the semantics of SH has been divided into 3 categories. We will explain clitic SH compositionally encode the exhaustive identification. We identify the syntactic and semantic properties of clitic SH on the basis of Kurdish material and argue its role in information structure and scope of focus.

 

The above abstract is part  of the article which was accepted at The First International Conference on Current Issues of Languages, Dialects and Linguistics (WWW.LLLD.IR) & The Third National Conference on English Studies and Linguistics (WWW.ELTL.IR) , 2-3 February 2017 , Iran-Ahwaz.

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